SepOct 2008: From the Publisher - Where you go, the industry follows

Words: Bronzella Cleveland

SeptemberOctober 2008


Masonry Design Magazine

John Llewellyn,
publisher

In 2007, Lionheart Publishing celebrated its 20th anniversary as a custom and contract publisher. Currently, Lionheart publishes six national magazines, including three titles for the construction industry. To learn more about the company, visit  www.lionhrtpub.com.

Masonry Design Magazine

John Llewellyn,
publisher

In 2007, Lionheart Publishing celebrated its 20th anniversary as a custom and contract publisher. Currently, Lionheart publishes six national magazines, including three titles for the construction industry. To learn more about the company, visit  www.lionhrtpub.com.

Masonry Design Magazine

John Llewellyn,
publisher

In 2007, Lionheart Publishing celebrated its 20th anniversary as a custom and contract publisher. Currently, Lionheart publishes six national magazines, including three titles for the construction industry. To learn more about the company, visit  www.lionhrtpub.com.

Sustainability. It’s not just a buzzword or short-lived building trend, though some may have viewed it that way when the practice first started making headway in the construction industry. We all know now that sustainability (or green building) is here to stay – and for good reason. So, for those owners, builders, designers and engineers out there who fail to adapt, it could be you whose time is short-lived. However, we all know that it is architects and engineers who actually are taking a great deal of the lead on pushing for sustainable projects. Where you go, the industry follows.

You help to establish the guidelines and building codes. You educate owners and encourage them to go green. You practice what you preach by incorporating or designing sustainable materials and systems into your own offices and homes. You are ensuring that responsible, green building is becoming the norm in building design and construction, and for that you are to be commended.

I wonder, however, that as the economy continues to falter, will green building suffer? Typically, green building materials and systems are more expensive to incorporate into new construction when compared with traditional methods. Generally, it is the long-term savings that entice many owners and developers to build green. But given the nation’s current financial situation, will we see more decision makers wince at the initial costs of sustainable design? (Never mind those who are canceling projects or electing not build in the first place.)

I don’t pretend to have the answer to this question, but I do know that the industry as a whole must stick together on this issue and continue to push for green projects and sustainable solutions. For the betterment of our environment, for the continued improvement of our quality of life, and for the sake of our industry we must not fall back on old habits. We must stand firm and resolve to make green building the industry standard. Your tenacity can make this a reality.

 – John Llewellyn

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